Click to visit the website and download the P25 guides

We are happy to announce the launch of our P25 Best Practice website complete with the first four P25 Best Practice guides:

  1. First steps to your P25 system
  2. Specifying your P25 system
  3. Procuring your P25 system
  4. Implementing your P25 system Continue Reading

Over the last few weeks, we have covered P25 radio communications in great detail, including An Introduction to P25, The P25 Standard and Compliance and Benefits of P25. As a recap and to tie everything in together, over the next few weeks we’ll present a glossary of all the P25 radio-related terms that you need to know.
A
AES
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is an encryption algorithm that uses keys of 256 bits.

Algorithm ID
The Algorithm ID is an identifier that specifies an encryption algorithm (for example, DES or AES). Continue Reading

P25 allows dispatch to have more control over defining talkgroups, prioritizing messages and integrating data.

P25 enjoys an almost unique capability in its ability to operate as a conventional, trunked, or simulcast system. As public safety agencies have already discovered, it is fairly straightforward from an engineering point of view to convert a P25 conventional network to trunking, while retaining the investment in the original network. Simulcast operation can be added to all or part of an existing trunked or conventional P25 system. Each mode of operation has its own strengths and tradeoffs which can be summarized as follows. Continue Reading

Public safety agencies across North America choose Tait’s P25 Simulcast solutions – here’s why:

  • 40% increase in cross-county coverage + digital encryption to foil drug gangs’ scanners
  • Narrowband compliant and digital ready + 50% cross-county coverage increase
  • Multi-agency secure solution with 90%+ coverage and 100% redudnancy
  • Dead spots deleted and communities safer in a shared solution for the City and State Continue Reading

Simulcast (simultaneous broadcasting) means multiple base stations transmitting the same voice (or data) signal on the same frequency at the same time. This means that every frequency pair – probably your existing channels – can each provide greatly extended coverage across a very wide area. The secret to Simulcast is high-stability transmitters and signal timing, structured and implemented by coverage experts to negate potential interference.

To understand how Simulcast works, let’s look at some simple simulcast networks: Continue Reading