Welcome to the Tait Manufacturing Facility. If you’ve ever wondered who makes our Tait radios, or how we ensure the highest possible standards for our products, then you’ve come to the right place. While many technology companies choose to outsource production, Tait has chosen to keep things in-house. We’re too obsessed with good quality to let anyone else build our radios.

We recently explored the area with our tour guide Aaron Robinson, the Production Manager. Come along with us on this exclusive look at our manufacturing facility that holds all our secret recipes. You’ll... Continue Reading

The City of Lexington celebrated the Go-Live of their new P25 digital communications system, which replaced an analog VHF system dating from the 1960s.

The system is being used by Lexington Police and Bluegrass Airport with plans for the fire service to switch later this year.

The Go-Live event marks the completion of a two year, $10 million project, for Fayette County Kentucky and Bluegrass Airport. In 2012, City of Lexington purchased a Cassidian 800MHz P25 trunked system and that year Tait won the contract to supply 550 TP9155/9160... Continue Reading

No one hates a mess more than us at Tait.
By Evan Forester, Tait Tough Tester.

Leaving dirty dishes out is one thing, but getting ice cream and chocolate syrup all over our TP9400 Portables is another.

So after topping our radio with copious amounts of French Vanilla, we threw it in the dishwasher on HEAVY DUTY, left the cameras rolling, and came back 2 hours later to see if it survived the water, soap, and steam. Not only did the radio turn on straight away, but it also came out clean, sparkly, and smelling fresh. Continue Reading

Can a Tait portable survive the raw ocean?
By Evan Forester, Tait Tough Tester.

Tait radios are IP67 certified, which means they have been proven to survive below 1 meter of water for thirty minutes. But the IP67 test occurs in a controlled and calm tube of water. We wanted to see how a Tait portable would handle being tossed into the ocean, full of crashing waves, salt, depth, sand, and even the occasional shark.

So without further ado, we hooked the Tait Portable to a fishing line and chucked it as far as we could into the crashing waves of the Pacific Ocean. It felt... Continue Reading

The ability to improve emergency-services organizations’ ICT systems with little flexibility to experiment with new technologies poses a conundrum for operational experts Australia-wide.
“The ongoing requirement for reliable systems and increasing situational awareness makes progress in emergency-services organisations (ESOs) a careful affair combining forward-looking vision with on-the-ground reality… the expansion of high-bandwidth 4G mobile networks offering new options for real-time communications, ESOs are finding they have access to a rapidly expanding range of solutions.” – GTR Magazine
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Coverage considerations will dictate the number and locations of your radio sites (also referred to as towers). Together with frequency availability and traffic patterns, they will determine whether the system should be simulcast, multicast or a hybrid of the two.

Coverage engineering may be the most complex area of the radio system specification and design process and is one critical area where your investment in a competent consultant will be well justified.

Measuring coverage
There are many ways to describe coverage performance. It is typically done in... Continue Reading

When Jim Wells County, an expansive county in South Texas and home to more than 40,000 citizens, first met us, they faced the threat of an outdated analog radio communications system that was unreliable and endangering the lives of the County’s law enforcement and emergency responders.

We committed to understanding the issues the County faced – a unique geography, limited funds, dated equipment and a tight schedule and delivered a three-site hybrid P25 digital and analog simulcast system. The Tait solution is now helping the County’s 400 law enforcement and emergency response agencies operate more effectively and safely. Continue Reading

Principal Engineer Ian Graham explores a common question in radio system design: whether to deploy duplexers or to use separate transmit and receive antennas.

On the face of it, using a duplexer to reduce the number of antennas required by the system sounds like a great idea. But, as usual with RF, it is never quite that simple… Let’s examine the technicalities of both approaches. Continue Reading

We’ve talked about the dangers of getting locked into the wrong P25 solution before. And yet, we still hear about people getting tangled in the proprietary web some vendors weave.

Genuine open standards are non-proprietary, so you are never under the control of one vendor. Choosing open standards will increase your choice of certified vendors and bring down prices, improve technical quality, and avoid the risk of being locked into a sole supplier. Continue Reading

The main difference between P25 Phase 1 and Phase 2 is system capacity, so the primary reason for opting for Phase 2 is additional capacity.

Phase 2 TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) doubles the number of talk paths compared with Phase 1. P25 Phase 2 TDMA creates two logical channels in one 12.5kHz physical channel. Because the Phase 2 control channel is unchanged from Phase 1 there is compatibility between the phases. Continue Reading