Tait offers software customization to add unique functionality and value to your communications system. We understand each organization has their own unique requirements, and not all challenges can be met with the same stock solutions. 

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Tait manages the communications network of one of the largest transport authorities in the world, with over 2 billion journeys made in their network each year. To ensure high-reliability voice and data connections between all buses and dispatch and control centres, proactive monitoring and management of the communications networks is essential.

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Not all problems can be solved with standard solutions. Occasionally, a technical or environmental challenge means there is no off-the-shelf product that can give a customer the outcome they need. While other critical communications vendors might say “Sorry, we can’t help you”, at Tait, we see it as an opportunity for us to put our ingenuity to work.

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Newmont Goldcorp, the world’s largest gold producer own and operate Boddington Gold Mine, a large open-pit mine located 75 miles (120km) east of Perth, Western Australia.

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The Boxborough Police and Fire Departments look after the City of Boxborough, a small town of about 5,000 people in Massachusetts, USA. They provide 24/7 police and fire coverage with the Police Force providing 13 full-time officers, and the Fire Department 29 firefighters.

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The City of Lexington is located in the central part of Kentucky and serves a population of 300,000 people. Their airport also services about 500,000 passengers a year.

Both the city and the airport partnered together to upgrade their communication system to an Airbus DS (formerly Cassidian) 800MHz P25 trunked system with 550 Tait TP9155/9160 portable radios and 250 TM9155 mobile radios.

The primary driver for choosing Tait and Airbus DS was their adherence to open-standards. The City of Lexington and the Bluegrass Airport both had bad experiences in the past with proprietary technology. Continue Reading

Anglo American’s Capcoal operates one underground mine (Grasstree), two open-cut mines (Lake Lindsay and Oak Park) and additional surface operations across the original Capcoal German Creek and German Creek-East sites, in the heart of the Bowen Basin in Central Queensland, Australia.

Capcoal’s operation covers 34,085 hectares (131.60 square miles) and annually produces in approximately 8.5 Mt (million tons) of prime quality hard coking coal and PCI coal.
Situation
Expansion of the Capcoal mines and topographical changes to the lease drove the need... Continue Reading

MACC 9-1-1 is the sole Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) in Grant County, WA. In 2013, MACC 9-1-1 received 63,831 emergency and non-emergency calls.

Dean Hane manages the MACC 9-1-1 radio communications infrastructure and system, dispatch console system and first responder subscriber equipment, and he recently shared about his experience working with Tait.

Tait, together with MACC 9-1-1, installed an 11-site TaitNet P25 Trunked Simulcast Network (800 MHz). Mr Hane says, we got the ‘full P25 meal deal’ with:

Rio Tinto Coal Australia manages the Bengalla Mining Company on behalf of Coal and Allied and other Joint Venture Partners.

Situated in the Upper Hunter Valley, New South Wales, the mine has operated since 1998.

The Setting
The Bengalla Mining Company required an upgrade of their radio communication system. The previous system created a number of frustrations for the mine’s growing operations, the most prominent being communication black spots.

For an open pit operation, the landscape is continually changing with spoil dumps created from the mining... Continue Reading

The client
The New Zealand Police (NZP) employs more than 10,000 staff around the country and has three Command and Control communication centers nationwide, located in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, which provide dispatch control services to the New Zealand Police and New Zealand Fire for frontline officers.
Situation
NZP desired a number of new capabilities, such as the ability to bridge the interoperability gaps between the different communications systems used at NZ Police (legacy analog and P25 digital) with systems from other Public Safety agencies and other devices that were going to become a part of the NZP’s mobile technology strategy. Continue Reading